Bird Watching in South Australia

 

Near Adelaide

 

 

The city of Adelaide is often referred to as the city of gardens.  Parks and gardens surround the main business district and a short walk will reward the bird watcher with common species.  Rainbow Lorikeets, Adelaide Rosellas, Red-rumped Parrots, New Holland Honeyeaters and White-plumed Honeyeaters are easily found.   In the city, an excellent spot is the Botanic Gardens on North Terrace, and the Botanic Park behind the gardens.  

 

A little further from the city are many conservation parks which are worth the drive not only for excellent bird life, but also for their beautiful bush settings. 

 

Adelaide Hills Region

Belair National Park

Aldinga Scrub

Para Wirra Recreation Park

Sandy Creek Conservation Park

 

 

    Adelaide Hills Region

 

Along eastern border of the city, the Adelaide Hills should not be overlooked by any bird watcher.  A leisurely stroll anywhere in the hills could be rewarding.  Some good spots include Morialta Conservation Park, Waterfall Gully, Brownhill Creek, Mt Lofty Botanic Gardens and  Shepherds Hill Recreation Park.

 

Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Golden Whistler

Eastern Spinebill

Mistletoebird

Red-browed Firetail

Elegant Parrot

Sacred Kingfisher

Eastern Rosella

 

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    Belair National Park

 

One of Adelaide’s most popular picnic parks, Belair is situated east of Adelaide in the foothills. There are ovals, tennis courts and large picnic areas for hire, or you can just pick a spot amongst the gum trees and enjoy the day. The habitat is mostly woodland with some majestic gum trees, but there are creeks and lakes to explore as well. A walk anywhere in the park is rewarding for the birdwatcher, and a comprehensive list of bird species is available at the entrance. 

 

Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo

Eastern Rosella

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Eastern Spinebill

Musk Lorikeet

Crested Shriketit

Tawny Frogmouth

Buff-banded Rail

Varied Sittella

Sacred Kingfisher

Australian Goshawk

Yellow-faced Honeyeater

 

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    Aldinga Scrub

 

South of Adelaide, near the township of Aldinga, there is an small park which can offer some excellent bird watching. There are sections of coastal scrub and bushland, which means a good variety of species. There are well-marked walking trails.  Depending on the season you may see a large variety of honeyeaters, woodswallows and birds of prey.

 

Elegant Parrot

Rufous Songlark

White-throated Gerygone

Mistletoebird

Yellow Thornbill

White-browed Babbler

Rainbow Bee-eater

Tawny-crowned Honeyeater

Yellow-rumped Pardalote

White-winged Triller

Weebill

Red-browed Firetail

 

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    Para Wirra Recreation Park

 

Similar to Belair, since it offers tennis courts and ovals for hire, this park is north of Adelaide, in a drier, more open environment.  There are numerous walks, and plenty of fabulous picnic spots. 

 

White- browed Scrubwren

Adelaide Rosella

Diamond Firetail

Wedge-tailed Eagle

Restless Flycatcher

Horsfield’s Bronze-Cuckoo

White-browed Babbler

Emu

White-winged Chough

Superb Fairy-Wren

Rainbow Bee-eater

Southern Whiteface

Variegated Fairy-Wren

Jacky Winter

Brown Treecreeper

 

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    Sandy Creek Conservation Park

Situated roughly midway between Sandy Creek and Lyndoch in the Barossa Valley, this spot is a gem. There are a number of walking tracks through this woodland park.  A surprising number of species can be observed here, and it is a lovely spot to spend the day…. Take a picnic!

Rainbow Bee-eater

White-browed Babbler

White-winged Chough

Rufous Whistler

Golden Whistler

Diamond Firetail

Peaceful Dove

Common Bronzewing

Zebra Finch

Weebill

Eastern Spinebill

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Elegant Parrot

Grey Butcherbird

Hooded Robin

 

 

    Other parks close to the city include:

 

Morialta Conservation Park

Cleland Conservation Park

Mt Lofty Botanic Gardens

Shepherds Hill Recreation Park

Scott Creek Conservation Park

Onkaparinga River National Park

St Kilda Mangroves

Greenfield Wetlands

 

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