Bird Watching in South Australia

Northern South Australia

The northern regions of the state are truly representative of Australia's outback.  Jagged peaks, woodlands and tree-lined creek beds make up one of the country's most spectacular national parks in the Flinders Ranges.  The Gammon Ranges further north are red and rugged, but full of wildlife.  Some of Australia's most elusive and fascinating bird species can be found in the remote desert regions.  The vast northern areas of South Australia are stunningly beautiful, enormously peaceful and full of amazing birds.  

Flinders and Gammon Ranges

Innamincka Regional Reserve and the coongie lakes

Marree to Lake Eyre National Park

Gawler Ranges Region

Googs Track

Simpson Desert

 

    Flinders and Gammon Ranges

The Flinders Ranges are about a 6 hour drive north of Adelaide.   There are well-maintained camping areas throughout the region, and accommodation can be readily found.  The rocky creek beds are lined with stately river red gums, while much of the area is covered in lightly wooded forests.  The Gammon Ranges offer a much different experience.  The rich colours of these northern peaks are unforgettable. There is such a diversity of habitat, that exploring these two regions for birds is very rewarding.  The best time to visit is spring,  when wildflowers are in bloom and the temperatures are mild

Emu

Collared Sparrowhawk

Wedge-tailed Eagle

Banded Lapwing

Black-fronted Plover

Inland Dotterel

Peaceful Dove

Mallee Ringneck

Mulga Parrot

Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoo

Red-backed Kingfisher

White-backed Swallow

White-winged Triller

Chirruping Wedgebill

Brown Songlark

White-winged Fairy-wren

Variegated Fairy-wren

Redthroat

Grey-fronted Honeyeater

White-fronted Honeyeater

Yellow-throated Miner

Red-capped Robin

Rufous Whistler

Grey Shrike-thrush

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    Innamincka Regional Reserve and the Coongie Lakes

Innamincka Regional Reserve is located in far north east South Australia, around the township of Innamincka and the oasis of the Cooper Creek. The birds flock to this oasis in the desert and you will see some wonderful bird life. Waterbirds abound in the creek, and the surrounding dry country can provide some surprise sightings.   Please visit the feature story on the Coongie Lakes for more information.

You will need to obtain a Desert Parks Pass in order to camp anywhere within the reserve. 

Emu

Hoary-headed Grebe

Australasian Grebe

Pelicans galore

Darter

Cormorants...

Egrets...

Herons...

Ibis...

Spoonbills...

Square-tailed Kite

Black-breasted Buzzard

Brown Goshawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

Little Eagle

Black-tailed Native-hen

Brolga

Australian Pratincole

Diamond Dove

Cockatiel

Budgerigar

Blue Bonnet

Red-backed Kingfisher

Rainbow Bee-eater

Cinnamon Quail-thrush

White-winged Fairy-wren

Southern Whiteface

Brown Treecreeper

Crimson Chat

Gibberbird

Red-browed Pardalote

Zebra Finch

Woodswallows...

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    Marree to Lake Eyre National Park

The enormous expanse of Lake Eyre is normally a huge salt lake…. the largest in Australia. The dry salty plains and its associated flora are home to some unique bird species.  When the lake is in flood, a scenic flight is an unforgettable experience.  The waters provide breeding conditions for pelicans, and many other waterbirds.  There are two accessible tracks in to Lake Eyre, but both are recommended for 4WD vehicles.  One is just north from Marree and the other heads east from William Creek.  

Black-shouldered Kite

Letter-winged Kite

Black Kite

Whistling Kite

Brown Falcon

Black-fronted Plover

Inland Dotterel

Australian Pratincole

Gull-billed Tern

Diamond Dove

Blue Bonnet

Budgerigar

Bourke’s Parrot

White-backed Swallow

Crimson Chat

Orange Chat

White-breasted Woodswallow

White-winged Fairy-wren

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    Gawler Ranges Region

The Gawler Ranges are situated across a large area north of Eyre Peninsula.  Few tourists are aware of the beauty to be found in this area, and the bird watching gives a taste of the wonderful species which can be found further north.  Although most roads in the ranges area are gravel, they are good roads and access to the region is easy.  The Gawler Ranges National Park is worth a look, as are Pinkawillinie Conservation Park and the Lake Gairdner region.  

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    Googs Track

Wedge-tailed Eagle

Googs Track travels through diverse arid environments and is an extremely rewarding birding experience.  There are regions of mallee, spinifex grass, salt lakes and arid scrub.  The birds listed below were seen along the track during a trip in July 2003.  Please visit the Goog's Track Feature Story for more information.

 

Wedge-tailed Eagle

Brown Falcon

Port Lincoln Parrot

Red-rumped Parrot

Blue Bonnet

Southern Scrub-robin

Red-capped Robin

Jacky Winter

White-winged Wren

Splendid Wren

Shy Hylacola

Southern Whiteface

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater

Yellow-throated Miner

Brown-headed Honeyeater

White-fronted Honeyeater

Mistletoebird

Zebra Finch

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    Simpson Desert

We travelled across the Simpson Desert in July 2004.  If you wish to find out about where we went and see some photographs please go to: Simpson Desert Feature

If you would just like some information about the birds of this region please go to: Simpson Birds .  Here you will find a shortened list of birds sighted and a number of favourite bird watching locations for the trip.

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